We believe that a community exists when people experience a sense of belonging, when people know each other, support each other and each person is enabled to contribute in his or her own way.

We strive to achieve this through the highest quality, human-centered services that recognise the abilities and support the aspirations and development of each individual.

Our approach is based on the belief that each person has the ability and the right to impart meaning and direction to their own life. We support this through relationships of openness, respect and collaboration to create opportunities that respond to the changing needs of the body, soul and spirit.

Our founding inspiration is a picture of each human being as a unique individual who enters into the world with a unique destiny to create a life of meaning and purpose as well as relationships through bodily, soul and spiritual capacities. It recognises the spiritual nature and wholeness of individuals regardless of ability or disability, gender, race, creed or background.

We celebrate each individual and his or her unique contribution.

 

What is the Steiner philosophy?

Inala’s work is inspired by the picture of the human being arising from the work of Dr Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925), the Austrian born philosopher, artist, educator and spiritual researcher.

Steiner’s multi-faceted work is known as anthroposophy, which he called ‘awareness of one’s humanity’. Anthroposophy embraces a spiritual view of each human being as a individual who enters into the world with a unique destiny to create a  life of  meaning and purpose as well as relationships through bodily, soul and spiritual capacities. It recognises the spiritual nature and wholeness of individuals, regardless of ability or disability, gender, race, creed or background.

Steiner’s many insights have been fruitfully applied in many fields, including psychology; education, agriculture, the arts, medicine and therapies, and the social sciences, giving rise to a new understanding of the spiritual foundations of modern life.

Anthroposophy has opened the door to new approaches and possibilities in a wide range of different spheres of life and work. The fields of education, curative education and social therapy (for people with disabilities), agriculture, healing, the sciences, economic endeavours, the arts, the social life, religion and psychology have all received fresh impulses from people working out of anthroposophy. Today, in almost every country around the world, initiatives based on the insights arising from anthroposophy can be found. In the field of support for persons living with disability, there are organisations, schools, centres and therapy practices in over 40 countries worldwide.